Tina Gunaldo, PhD, DPT, MHS
Director, Center for Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice
Louisiana State University Health-New Orleans
Tina Gunaldo is the director for the Center for Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice at Louisiana State University Health-New Orleans. In addition to presentations and publications, Dr. Gunaldo serves on the American Interprofessional Health Collaborative Scholarship Committee, the Louisiana Immunization Workgroup supporting a collaborative approach to increasing immunization rates, and the American Physical Therapy Association Finance Committee. She is the co-editor in chief for the Health, Interprofessional Practice and Education journal and is a co-editor for the textbook "Interprofessional Education and Collaboration: An Evidence-Based Approach to Optimizing Health Care."

Presenting at the Nexus Summit:

An important component in developing collaborative practice skills is the evolution of an interprofessional identity.1 Breaking down barriers where students are asked to reflect and dialogue on their stereotypes is fundamental in developing an interprofessional identity. The challenge for educators is to understand what perceptions exist, so that appropriate and meaningful IPE experiences can be developed.There are three quantitative instruments commonly used in interprofessional research to measure stereotypes among health professional students. These instruments ask participants to rate…
The Commission on Dental Accreditation standards require that dental and dental hygiene learners participate in interprofessional education (IPE) during their academic training. IPE is an integral step towards developing practitioners who understand their own roles, the roles of other health professionals, and who can effectively communicate and collaborate with other providers. An initial step in the acquisition and application of IPE is for students to perceive it as relevant. Learners who appreciate the relevance of a topic are more likely to engage with the material and, in the case of…
Tools for measuring outcomes of interprofessional education (IPE) have been criticized as having weak evidence for validity. The purpose of this study was to compare previous validity evidence for three commonly used self-report tools with data from 684 learners at four U.S. universities to better understand how these measures perform across contexts and learner levels. The research team consisted of faculty representing athletic training, dentistry, dental hygiene, dietetics, medicine, nursing, physical therapy, and public health, who came together to learn about, from, and with each other…
There is a gap in the academic literature evaluating the long-term impacts of student outcomes post-engagement in high fidelity simulation interprofessional education (IPE) experiences. The authors sought to investigate student perceptions of interprofessional skills after engagement in a simulation experience during the 2018-19 academic year and post-engagement in similarly focused simulation experience one year later. The research question investigated was "do 3rd-year medical students retain their perceptions of interprofessional skills after a high-fidelity simulation post 1 year."  …
Self-reported assessment tools are commonly used in IPE to measure change in student attitudes and/or perceptions. Real time pre-tests measurements are subject to ‘response-shift bias’. A response-shift bias occurs when there is a change in the participant’s understanding of the content, therefore changing the participant’s standard of measurement (Howard and Dailey, J. Appl. Psychol. 64, 144; 1979). The Student Perceptions of Interprofessional Clinical Education - Revised 2 (SPICE-R2) tool is used to measure students’ perceptions towards interprofessional teamwork and team-based practice (…