Lightning Talk

Early Mobilization in the Intensive Care Unit: An Educational Program to Foster Teamwork

Thursday, August 6, 2020, 1:15 pm - 2:15 pm EDT
acute care/icucontinuum - students and residentsassessment/evaluationinterprofessional clinical learning environments
Sample video
Lightning Talk Presentation
Sample video
Lightning Talk Live Discussion Recording
Accreditation Information
The recording of this session has been accredited for Interprofessional Continuing Education credit (IPCE) as enduring material. After watching this recording, you may claim IPCE credit by clicking this link. Interprofessional Continuing Education Credit is available to claim through December 31, 2020. Please see details below.

Introduction:

Every year in the United States, more than 5.7 million patients are admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU), of which 25-50% develop ICU-acquired weakness (ICU-AW), defined as new onset weakness that occurs during critical illness. Patients with ICU-AW have worse outcomes including increased mortality, longer hospitalizations, worse quality of life years after they leave the ICU, and greater healthcare costs. Early mobilization is a low-risk strategy associated with improvement in ICU-AW, and society guidelines recommend a multidisciplinary approach, including physical therapists (PT) and physicians, for rehabilitation and mobilization in critically ill patients. However, at Emory University School of Medicine, Doctor of PT (DPT) and medical doctor (MD) students participate in separate critical care curriculums and clinical rotations, and are unlikely to develop core competencies for the interprofessional approach recommended in the early mobilization of patients in the ICU.

 

Methods:

To optimize practice in the interprofessional clinical learning environment, we merged DPT and MD students’ critical care curriculums using team-based didactics and simulations, with the focus on early mobilization of patients in the ICU. To evaluate the impact on interprofessional education, we administered a 19-item student survey to the first student cohort (n=29) on attitudes towards teamwork (5-point Likert scale) both pre- and post-curriculum, and compared them using unpaired t-tests.

 

Results:

After the curriculum, students answered that they were more able to communicate effectively about patient care with persons from healthcare professions other than their own (p=0.022), more able to use terminology that is unique to other healthcare professions (p < 0.01), and better understood the roles of other health care professionals (p=0.014).

 

Discussion:

Students held more favorable attitudes towards teamwork after an interprofessional curriculum combining DPT and MD students. This approach can be expanded to enhance student experience for future clinical education and practice, and ultimately improve patient outcomes.

 

Disclosures:

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education’s Standards for Commercial Support, adopted by the Joint Accreditors for Interprofessional Continuing Education, the National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education has a conflict of interest policy that requires that all individuals involved in the development of activity content disclose their relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. All potential conflicts of interest that arise based upon these financial relationships are resolved prior to the educational activity.

Fernando Ona, Samuel Lowe, Steven Bingaman, Bethany Robertson, Amisha Metha, Jessica Star, Meredith Lora, Shirly Kooran, Beth Quatrara, Beth Turrentine, Danny Harris, Lisa Daniels, Kathy Lee Bishop, Jennifer Sharp, Caroline Coleman, Douglas Ander, Chase Corvin, Anastasia Pozdnyakova, Kelli Yukon, Allison Norenberg, Kimisha Cassidy, Kevin Roggin, Ross Milner, Vineet Arora

declare no vested interest in or affiliation with any commercial interest offering financial support for this interprofessional continuing education activity, or any affiliation with a commercial interest whose philosophy could potentially bias their presentation.

 

 

Accreditation Details

In support of improving patient care, this activity is planned and implemented by The National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education. The National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

As a Jointly Accredited Provider, the National Center is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved under this program. State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit. The National Center maintains responsibility for this course. Social workers completing this course receive continuing education credits.

This activity was planned by and for the healthcare team, and learners will receive Interprofessional Continuing Education (IPCE) credit for learning and change.

  • Physicians: This activity will be designated for CME AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM through ACCME.
  • Physician Assistants: NCCPA accepts AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ from organizations accredited by ACCME or a recognized state medical society.
  • Nurses: This activity will be designated for CNE nursing contact hours through ANCC.
  • Pharmacists and Pharmacy Technicians: This activity will be designated for CPE contact hours (CEUs) through ACPE.
  • Social Workers: This activity will be designated for social work continuing education credits through ASWB.
  • All health professionals: This activity was planned by and for the healthcare team, and learners will receive Interprofessional Continuing Education (IPCE) credit for learning and change.